Friday, June 22, 2012

Welcome to Historic Rugby

Like most people, my wife and I found Rugby strictly by accident. We stumbled onto it in 1971 while out cruising the mountain roads in our then MGB. It's in a very rural part of east Tennessee, as evidenced by the hay bales in the field behind the welcome sign. We began coming here regularly a decade later after tiring of the crowds in and around the Smoky Mountains. Here we found peace, quiet, and friendly folks, and a large National Park under development with (then) almost no one in it. It became our preferred place to hike.

Our mountains aren't quite as high as the Smokies/Blue Ridge, but we still love them. So when we were able, we moved here. Unfortunately, we don't have oil beneath our land like some of our neighbors have. In this photo you can see an oil well pump jack and separator tanks. One of the local farmers told me that when he bought his land the seller had offered it without the mineral rights. Those would be $5,000 extra. He decided to go ahead and buy the mineral rights. He said it was the best investment he ever made. The oil they later found paid off the farm and sent all of his children to college.

This final shot has nothing to do with this post, except I liked the patch of butterfly weed that was growing near the welcome sign.

Y'all come! It's peaceful here!


8 comments:

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rugby,_Tennessee

    I'll have to come by for a visit some time.
    Looks like a nice place to spend some time.

    You had me with old MGB.

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    1. We'll be glad to have you visit, John. The nearby Clear Fork, Big South Fork, and Obed Rivers all have good whitewater in season. Our mountain roads are great for cruising with sports cars or motorcycles. We especially like to drive "The Devil's Triangle" at the south end of the county. We have lots of hiking trails nearby, and riders love to bring their horses to the Big South Fork park. And if you're looking for peace and quiet, Rugby is a great place to find it. We have B&Bs and a full-time resident population of less than 50!

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  2. I am always reminded of the hardships, and times of being homesick when I visit Rugby.
    Those early settlers were indeed true pioneers...
    My favorite buildings, are the church and the library, the smell of old books, and the wooden bookshelves evoke so many memories.
    Lovely post.
    ~Jo

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  3. Thanks for the invite though it's extremely unlikely that I'll ever venture across the old Atlantical Ocean. So I'll have to experience it second-hand through your blog.

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  4. Beautiful. I especially love those big round bales.

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  5. Wonderful post Jim! I'd love to visit Rugby sometime soon.

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    1. Come anytime, Christine. Have Kris bring you.

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  6. Beautiful pictures! I'm looking forward to my visit!

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